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MIT OpenCourseWare  ●  Online
Course Features Special feature - video Image galleries Course Highlights This course features a documentary by Prof. Slyomovics, as well as a wealth of photographs and folk art, in the study materials section. Course Description This course examines traditional performances of the Arabic-speaking populations of the Middle East and North Africa. Starting with the history of the ways in which the West has discovered, translated and written about the Orient, we will consider how power and politics play roles in the production of culture, narrative and performance. This approach assumes that performance, verbal art, and oral literature lend themselves to spontaneous adaptation and to oblique expression of ideas and opinions whose utterance would otherwise be censorable or disruptive. In particular we will be concerned with the way traditional performance practices are affected by and respond to the consequences of modernization. Topics include oral epic performance, sacred narrative, Koranic chant performance, the folktale, solo performance, cultural production and resistance. MIT OpenCourseWare makes the materials used in the teaching of almost all of MIT's subjects available on the Web, free of charge. With more than 2,200 courses available, OCW is delivering on the promise of open sharing of knowledge.
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BUx  ●  Online
This is a past/archived course. At this time, you can only explore this course in a self-paced fashion. Certain features of this course may not be active, but many people enjoy watching the videos and working with the materials. Make sure to check for reruns of this course. Over thirty years ago, confident in the superiority of American military power, the United States set out to "fix" the Greater Middle East. Since that time, U.S. troops, covert operatives and proxies have engaged in costly exertions in predominantly Muslim societies everywhere from the Levant and the Persian Gulf to East Africa and Central Asia. With what result? Washington's efforts have exacted a terrible toll, squandering vast amounts of blood and treasure. In the meantime, the Islamic world has become less stable while anti-American radicalism flourishes. America’s War for the Greater Middle East has failed, and that failure is irreversible. This course offers a history of that war. It identifies the factors that inspired the United States to launch the conflict and to persist in a doomed enterprise. It describes how the war unfolded from one phase to the next, from the era of Jimmy Carter to the age of Barack Obama. It catalogs errors of judgment and implementation made along the way. It invites students to consider alternative approaches to policy that might have better served the interests of the United States and of the people living in countries invaded, occupied, bombed and otherwise subjected to American punishment.
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MIT OpenCourseWare  ●  Online
Course Highlights This course features archived syllabi from various semesters. Course Description This course aims to provide students with a general overview of basic themes and issues in Middle Eastern history from the rise of Islam to the present, with an emphasis on the encounters and exchanges between the "Middle East" (Southwest Asia and North Africa) and the "West" (Europe and the United States). MIT OpenCourseWare makes the materials used in the teaching of almost all of MIT's subjects available on the Web, free of charge. With more than 2,200 courses available, OCW is delivering on the promise of open sharing of knowledge.
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MIT OpenCourseWare  ●  Online
Course Features Assignments (no solutions) Course Highlights This course includes handouts related to the topic and general writing guides, which are located in the study materials section. This course also features archived syllabi from various semesters. Course Description This course explores the 20th-century history of the Middle East, concentrating on the Fertile Crescent, Egypt, Turkey, the Arabian peninsula, and Iran. We will begin by examining the late Ottoman Empire and close with the events of 9/11 and their aftermath. Readings will include historical surveys, novels, and primary source documents. MIT OpenCourseWare makes the materials used in the teaching of almost all of MIT's subjects available on the Web, free of charge. With more than 2,200 courses available, OCW is delivering on the promise of open sharing of knowledge.
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saylor.org Academy  ●  Online
This course will introduce you to the history of the nations and peoples of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from 1919 to the present.You will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout the region during this 100-year period.This course will have a chronological structure.Each unit will include representative primary source documents that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes, such as the emergence of nationalist movements following World War I, European political and economic imperialism during the first half of the 20th century, the creation of the nation of Israel, regional economic development, and the impact of secular and religious trends on Middle Eastern society and culture during the second half of the 20th century.By the end of this course, you will understand how the countries of the region have overcome significant social, economic, and political problems as they have grown from weak former colonies into modern nation-states, and you will recognize the challenges that these nations currently face as they struggle with issues of economic development as well as social and political unrest. This course will introduce you to the history of the nations and peoples of the Middle East and Southwest Asia from 1919 to the present.You will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout the region during this 100-year period.This course will have a chronological structure.Each unit will include representative primary source documents that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes, such as the emergence of nationalist movements following World War I, European political and economic imperialism during the first half of the 20th century, the creation of the nation of Israel, regional economic development, and the impact of secular and religious trends on Middle Eastern society and culture during the second half of the 20th century.By the end of this course, you will understand how the countries of the region have overcome significant social, economic, and political problems as they have grown from weak former colonies into modern nation-states, and you will recognize the challenges that these nations currently face as they struggle with issues of economic development as well as social and political unrest.
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Universal Class  ●  Online
Lesson 2: Setting the Stage: A Very Brief History of the Middle East, Part II This lesson examines the various religious sects within Islam and also provides a political background that lead to the Iran-Iraq War and, ultimately, the Persian Gulf War at the end of the 20th century.
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saylor.org Academy  ●  Online
This course will introduce you to the history of Central Eurasia and the Silk Road from 4500 B.C.E to the nineteenth century. You will learn about the culture of the nomadic peoples of Central Eurasia as well as the development of the Silk Road. The course will be structured chronologically; each unit will focus on one aspect of the Silk Road during a specific time period. Each unit will include representative primary- and secondary-source documents that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes, such as the discovery and production of silk in China, diplomatic relations between Han China and nomadic peoples of the Eurasian steppe, the international scope of the Silk Road trade routes, European interest in finding a “new silk route” to China, and the “Great Game” between China, Russia, and Great Britain in Central Eurasia in the nineteenth century. By the end of the course, you will understand how the Silk Road influenced the development of nomadic societies in Central Eurasia as well as powerful empires in China, the Middle East, and Europe.
Anytime
saylor.org Academy  ●  Online
At various points in history, the Middle East has been at the center of world civilization. In the last century, however, the Middle East has been subjected to the conquest, colonization, and control of outside powers: the Ottoman Empire, the great European powers, and the United States. This dynamic has had profound implications for the political identity of both Middle Easterners and their conquerors. It has also meant that much of the recent political history of the Middle East has been a struggle for independence and state-building—a struggle that continues to this day with profound implications for the region and the world as a whole. This course has two primary purposes: (1) to build a critical understanding of the key issues and conflicts in the politics of the modern Middle East and (2) to apply the following concepts to these issues and conflicts: scholarly methodology, colonialism, independence and state-building, the political mobilization of new social classes, the spread of capitalist economic relations, Arab nationalism, relations between the Arab states, the Middle East as an arena of the Cold War, Islamic revivalism, globalization and economic restructuring, democratization, and the significance of non-state actors. These objectives will be pursued beginning with some framing readings and videos on recent developments in the Middle East and on the methods available to understand and analyze those developments. You will then inquire into the background of these recent developments through study of the political history of various regions of the Middle East and of foreign influence in those regions. Toward the end of the course, you will return to the most significant issues confronting the region today for a more sustained and, ideally, more critical engagement with them.
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MIT OpenCourseWare  ●  Online
Course Description International Women’s Voices has several objectives. It introduces students to a variety of works by contemporary women writers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and North America. The emphasis is on non-western writers. The readings are chosen to encourage students to think about how each author’s work reflects a distinct cultural heritage and to what extent, if any, we can identify a female voice that transcends national cultures. In lectures and readings distributed in class, students learn about the history and culture of each of the countries these authors represent. The way in which colonialism, religion, nation formation and language influence each writer is a major concern of this course. In addition, students examine the patterns of socialization of women in patriarchal cultures, and how, in the imaginary world, authors resolve or understand the relationship of the characters to love, work, identity, sex roles, marriage, and politics. MIT OpenCourseWare makes the materials used in the teaching of almost all of MIT's subjects available on the Web, free of charge. With more than 2,200 courses available, OCW is delivering on the promise of open sharing of knowledge.
Anytime
MIT OpenCourseWare  ●  Online
Course Features Lecture notes Assignments (no solutions) Exams (no solutions) Course Description This subject focuses on the objects, history, context, and critical discussion surrounding art since World War II. Because of the burgeoning increase in art production, the course is necessarily selective. We will trace major developments and movements in art up to the present, primarily from the US; but we will also be looking at art from Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as art "on the margins" — art that has been overlooked by the mainstream critical press, but may have a broad cultural base in its own community. We will ask what function art serves in its various cultures of origin, and why art has been such a lightning rod for political issues around the world. MIT OpenCourseWare makes the materials used in the teaching of almost all of MIT's subjects available on the Web, free of charge. With more than 2,200 courses available, OCW is delivering on the promise of open sharing of knowledge.
Anytime

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