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If you haven't heard of it yet and you are in need of an authentication for your brand new app, you're in luck. This platform includes single-sign on, social login, fully featured admin console, account management console, OAuth2 and OpenShift cartridge. Even though Keycloak is in alpha stage, it offers support for granting access third party applications and role based authorization. The one giving the talk is Stian Thorgersen, co-leader of the project and a Senior Software Engineer at Red Hat. That is why, if you were to chose OpenShift for your PaaS developing support, you'd already have a Keycloak module ready. Find out more about Keycloak, the SSO Service for web apps and REST services, what it can do and stay up to date with new developments. Or go straight to the Keycloak GitHub repo.
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No matter what database engine you pick for your next application, 99% of the times, you can't go around searching through that data that you're saving. Each database has it's own features, strengths and weaknesses when it comes to searching. A lot of people externalise their search indexes to different engines such as Elasticsearch (what we use on DevCasts) or Lucene because the database is somewhat limited or simply they don't want to pounder their databases with search queries that are known to take a lot of resources, time and space. When it comes to MySql you have 3 obvious choices that I know of: use the simple search matching strings with LIKE and wildcards: SELECT * FROM posts WHERE title LIKE '%mysql%' use a slow and hungry regular expression for matching: SELECT * FROM posts WHERE title RLIKE '[[:<:]]mysql[[:>:]]' use a FULL TEXT index and match against that index: SELECT * FROM posts WHERE MATCH(title) AGAINST ('mysql') The talk is also great because it goes through all of these search types of MySql and shows you what slows them down, what does and does not hit the indexes and why. It's very important for searches performed in such databases to know how to create your indexes based on how you structure your queries. As an example they show a phonebook table where you would store the person's full name and an index for that entry:
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The first screencast starts with an introduction to programming lexical analysis. It goes on explaining what LEX (A Lexical Analyzer Generator) is, what it does and how it works, followed by a code example to wrap it all up in context. In the second video, Jonathan Engelsma gives us an accurate description of YACC (Yet Another Compiler-Compiler) and how it works, providing us with an example for better understanding. He then uses both LEX and YACC to develop a simple language processing system, giving us the tools to develop our own basic programming language. You can find the code below, or access it on GitHub myscanner.c #include #include "myscanner.h" extern int yylex(); extern int yylineno; extern char* yytext; char *names[] = {NULL, "db_type", "db_name", "db_table_prefix", "db_port"}; int main(void) { int ntoken, vtoken; ntoken = yylex(); while(ntoken) { printf("%d\n", ntoken); if(yylex() != COLON) { printf("Syntax error in line %d, Expected a ':' but found %s\n", yylineno, yytext); return 1; } vtoken = yylex(); switch (ntoken) { case TYPE: case NAME: case TABLE_PREFIX: if(vtoken != IDENTIFIER) { printf("Syntax error in line %d, Expected an identifier but found %s\n", yylineno, yytext); return 1; } printf("%s is set to %s\n", names[ntoken], yytext); break; case PORT: if(vtoken != INTEGER) { printf("Syntax error in line %d, Expected an integer but found %s\n", yylineno, yytext); return 1; } printf("%s is set to %s\n", names[ntoken], yytext); break; default: printf("Syntax error in line %d\n",yylineno); } ntoken = yylex(); } return 0; } myscanner.h #define TYPE 1 #define NAME 2 #define TABLE_PREFIX 3 #define PORT 4 #define COLON 5 #define IDENTIFIER 6 #define INTEGER 7 myscanner.l %{ #include "myscanner.h" %} %option nounput yylineno %% : return COLON; "db_type" return TYPE; "db_name" return NAME; "db_table_prefix" return TABLE_PREFIX; "db_port" return PORT; [a-zA-Z][_a-zA-Z0-9]* return IDENTIFIER; [1-9][0-9]* return INTEGER; [ \t\n] ; . printf("unexpected character\n"); %% int yywrap(void) { return 1; }
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Ruby on Rails is a great framework using the Ruby language which gained a huge trend a few years back and also set many of the standards current frameworks use today. I believe it lost some of that momentum when Node.js was launched and the whole new set and ways of doing web applications that followed it (websockets, real-time etc.). Regardless of that Ruby on Rails is known for adapting very fast and pushing new standards with each release. The framework itself is very rich if I may say so and has almost anything that you may need for your project. Anything else can be installed with the gems which are a huge part of it's popularity. A lot of people contributed with so many well written packages (gems) that it's almost impossible to have to write one yourself. And this helps a lot trust me. Have a good watch and learn what's new in Rails 4.
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Creating a HTML responsive site will never be hard to do after you see this video. The creator show simple techniques that helps you to create your website and be fully responsive on your mobile.It's and 1 hour video worth to watch and will help new web developers to gain knowledge.
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Sailsjs also connects your application to a default socket.io local server for real-time (well...kind-of) applications, has a quite advanced routing in place and provides a pretty advanced way of structuring and modeling your data. I talk from experience, Sailsjs is pretty cool, I'm not sure it has acquired the required momentum to keep on but it's definitely a player among server-side javascript frameworks. Even by judging that they try to provide a default when it comes to
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Hey, I'm John Morris. I'm the Lead Instructor for the WishList Member Certified Developers program and I help new coders fast-track their freelance coding career so they can kill their day job, provide for their families, and be free to live life on their terms. Several years ago I was in a similar situation to most new coders. I was teaching myself how to code but was scared to take on clients... so I was still work a day job at a local pizza restaurant. I absolutely hated my job. In fact, I felt like a little bit of a failure for working there and I knew I was capable of so much more. Even worse was that I couldn't provide for my family. The income I made wasn't anywhere close to enough and my wife had to keep taking overtime for us to pay our bills. I was frustrated, overwh...
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TypeScript is another language that compiles into plain Javascript but with the advantage of having the possibility to write type safe applications which are better for large applications where multiple programmers work. It has the same enhancements you would find in coffeescript for example like classes and such but also many other cool things such as modules and exporting. Another advantage of Typescript over other similar tools is the fact that you can write plain Javascript in a typescript file and it will still work so the learning curve is zero if you already know Javascript.
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Before Neo4j and graph databases I remember I was playing this game called EVE which had a universe with hundreds of systems (like our own planetary system) and constellations. You travel through systems activating jump gates and you can't cheat (unless you use a wormhole) by jumping through more than one system at a time to get where you need to. My application was supposed to show you, depending on your current location, how many enemies are in nearby systems. By nearby I mean a radius of 10 - 20 systems around you. In order for me to know what systems are in your radius I have to get all systems right next to you and start looping getting all systems around those and so on until I meet that radius. This is called tree traversal. My application also had an option to add waypoints and it was supposed to show you the shortest route from your location in order to reach those waypoints. This is also a well known algorithm and a problem in the mathematical world called Travelling salesman problem. Whenever I reached past a certain number of waypoints the application would start to take so long because of this exponential algorithm that it was becoming totally unusable and I had to limit the number of waypoints you can set. There are a bunch of such algorithms to solve this issue but they all meet at some point in performance and time. I remember I went so deep in trying to solve this issue that I even studied ants and their way of finding shortest distances from point A to boint B (no kidding, ants do that). No need to mention that my app remained the same with that limit of maximum 6 systems in radius to avoid frustrating my users with load times. They didn't know about my backend issues so it's better with a limit rather than annoy them with a 30 seconds delay until I show results. Neo4j was built for this sort of things. Everything in Neo is about nodes, relations and traversals. It's perfect for websites with social activity (facebook: find friends of friends of friends?), for traveling websites, for a distribution application (knowing shortest paths to reach your destinations means less fuel spent) or even for my space ship pew pew game. It is mature enough to be tested and they offer you an admin on top of it so you can view and play with your data. It also has a ton of connectors for languages and frameworks so you should have 0 problems in picking it up and running.
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This talk is on advanced features, I remember doing just fine in Python without them when I started learning this language but they certainly can be very useful in some situations. It's a good thing to know such methods because there are situations where they are needed and how would you know you need a decorator unless you learned what decorators do. I really recommend studying these methods. P.S. Audio starts somewhere at minute 4!
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As you've surely learned by now, Python is a dynamic, all purpose, object orientated programming language, that accentuates code readability and comes with a very large and comprehensive standard library. Brian Will is here again to help you get your feet wet on learning Python with this wonderful series. Give it a try, you might stick with it.
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