in
Discover classes on the go.
UC BerkeleyX  ●  Online
This is a past/archived course. At this time, you can only explore this course in a self-paced fashion. Certain features of this course may not be active, but many people enjoy watching the videos and working with the materials. Make sure to check for reruns of this course. CS169.1x teaches the fundamentals for engineering long-lasting software using highly-productive Agile techniques to develop Software as a Service (SaaS) using Ruby on Rails. Students will understand the new challenges and opportunities of SaaS versus shrink-wrapped software. They will understand and apply fundamental programming techniques to the design, development, testing, and public cloud deployment of a simple SaaS application. Students will use best-of-breed tools that support modern development techniques including behavior-driven design, user stories, test-driven development, velocity, and pair programming. Students will learn how modern programming language features like metaprogramming and reflection can improve productivity and code maintainability. Students will work on weekly coding projects and quizzes. Those who successfully complete the assignments and earn a passing grade can get an honor code certificate or verified certificate from BerkeleyX. The videos and homeworks used in this offering of the course were revised in October 2013. The new class also includes embedded live chat with Teaching Assistants and other students and opportunities for remote pair programming with other students. Before your course starts, try the new edX Demo where you can explore the fun, interactive learning environment and virtual labs.Learn more.
Anytime
UC BerkeleyX  ●  Online
This course will examine Oscar Wilde’s only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray. This novel was first published as a serial novel in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine in 1890. The Picture of Dorian Gray was immediately controversial, and was censored by the magazine’s editors. Even with the censorship, reviewers still thought that Wilde ought to have been prosecuted for violating laws concerning public morality. This story has two important themes: the idea of selling one’s soul, and the theme of living a double life. Wilde takes these themes to their extreme. Participants in this course will read, discuss, and write about the text and its influence. As in most book clubs, the focus will be on lively discussion. Course materials will include background information for understanding the text, as well as vocabulary and language support. Assessment will include quizzes and short writing assignments. This is the fourth part of the BerkeleyX Book Club offerings.
Anytime
UC BerkeleyX  ●  Online
College Writing 2.1x is an introduction to academic writing for English Language Learners, focusing on essay development, grammatical correctness, and self-editing. The five-week course comprises a review of basic grammar terminology and understanding; writing effective sentences and paragraphs; introductions and conclusions; strategies for writing longer texts; and thesis statements. The course materials will be offered via readings and videos. An optional course workbook, in ebook form, may be used for additional writing work. Students will participate in online discussions as well as peer review. Students will complete an essay for this part of the course. In partnership with the U.S. Department of State UC Berkeley is partnering with the U.S. Department of State to extend the reach of College Writing 2X. Participating U.S. Embassies will host in-person, facilitated discussions sessions around the course content in order to maximize the learning experience. The State Department-supported EducationUSA network will also offer facilitated discussions in some locations for students interested in pursuing higher education in the United States. This partnership is part of the English Education Alliance (E2A), a global effort of the U.S. Department of State to address the global demand for 21st century English language skills.
Anytime
UC BerkeleyX  ●  Online
We all want to be happy, and there are countless ideas about what happiness is and how we can get some. But not many of those ideas are based on science. That’s where this course comes in. “The Science of Happiness” is the first MOOC to teach the ground-breaking science of positive psychology, which explores the roots of a happy and meaningful life. Students will engage with some of the most provocative and practical lessons from this science, discovering how cutting-edge research can be applied to their own lives. Created by UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center, the course will zero in on a fundamental finding from positive psychology: that happiness is inextricably linked to having strong social connections and contributing to something bigger than yourself—the greater good. Students will learn about the cross-disciplinary research supporting this view, spanning the fields of psychology, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, and beyond. What’s more, “The Science of Happiness” will offer students practical strategies for nurturing their own happiness. Research suggests that up to 40 percent of happiness depends on our habits and activities. So students will learn many different research-tested practices that foster social and emotional well-being—and the course will help them track their happiness along the way. The course’s co-instructors, Dacher Keltner and Emiliana Simon-Thomas, are not only leading authorities on positive psychology but also gifted teachers skilled at making science feel fun and personal. They’ll be joined by world-renowned experts discussing themes like empathy, mindfulness, and gratitude—experts including Barbara Fredrickson, Paul Ekman, Sonja Lyubomirsky, and Jon Kabat-Zinn. Health professionals who register can earn continuing education units for their participation. Consider signing up for this course with a friend - tweet about your registration, share it on Facebook, and use the buddy system to stay on track. Join the conversation on The Greater Good Science Center Facebook page.
Anytime
UC BerkeleyX  ●  Online
CS 169.2x is the second half of University of California, Berkeley's semester long course on Engineering Software as a Service. In the first half of the course, CS 169.1x, students use Agile development methods to deploy a simple SaaS app in the cloud. In the second half, CS 169.2x, students create more sophisticated apps by adding relationships between models in apps and by enhancing their apps with JavaScript. They also learn about what happens after the apps are deployed to real users, including how to monitor performance, identify and fix common performance problems, and avoid compromising customer data. Finally, students learn how to apply Agile techniques to enhance and refactor legacy code, a critical skill for professional programmers. Other topics covered in CS 169.2x include: How to form, organize and manage small programming teams Introduction to design patterns: what they are and how to recognize opportunities to apply them Using Rails for more advanced features like third-party authentication and elegantly expressing design patterns that arise frequently in SaaS There will be three homework assignments: two programming assignments and one assignment about operations/deployment. There will also be several short quizzes. The videos and homeworks used in this offering of the course were revised in October 2013. Before your course starts, try the new edX Demo where you can explore the fun, interactive learning environment and virtual labs. Learn more.
Anytime
UC BerkeleyX  ●  Online
This is a past/archived course. At this time, you can only explore this course in a self-paced fashion. Certain features of this course may not be active, but many people enjoy watching the videos and working with the materials. Make sure to check for reruns of this course. We are surrounded by information, much of it numerical, and it is important to know how to make sense of it. Stat2x is an introduction to the fundamental concepts and methods of statistics, the science of drawing conclusions from data. The course is the online equivalent of Statistics 2, a 15-week introductory course taken in Berkeley by about 1,000 students each year. Stat2x is divided into three 5-week components. Stat2.1x is the first of the three. The focus of Stat2.1x is on descriptive statistics. The goal of descriptive statistics is to summarize and present numerical information in a manner that is illuminating and useful. The course will cover graphical as well as numerical summaries of data, starting with a single variable and progressing to the relation between two variables. Methods will be illustrated with data from a variety of areas in the sciences and humanities. There will be no mindless memorization of formulas and methods. Throughout Stat2.1x, the emphasis will be on understanding the reasoning behind the calculations, the assumptions under which they are valid, and the correct interpretation of results.
Anytime
UC BerkeleyX  ●  Online
This is a past/archived course. At this time, you can only explore this course in a self-paced fashion. Certain features of this course may not be active, but many people enjoy watching the videos and working with the materials. Make sure to check for reruns of this course. EECS149.1x introduces students to the design and analysis of cyber-physical systems --- computational systems that are integrated with physical processes. Applications of such systems include medical devices and systems, consumer electronics, toys and games, assisted living, traffic control and safety, automotive systems, process control, energy management and conservation, environmental control, aircraft control systems, communications systems, instrumentation, critical infrastructure control (electric power, water resources, and communications systems for example), robotics and distributed robotics (telepresence, telemedicine), defense systems, manufacturing, and smart structures. A major theme of the course is on the interplay of practical design with formal models of systems, including both software components and physical dynamics. A major emphasis will be on building high confidence systems with real-time and concurrent behaviors. Students will apply concepts learned in lectures to programming a robotic controller in a specially-designed virtual laboratory environment with built-in automatic grading and feedback mechanisms. This edX course is an online adaptation of the UC Berkeley undergraduate course EECS 149, covering a subset of topics that are especially relevant for the lab component of that class.
Anytime
UC BerkeleyX  ●  Online
This is a past/archived course. At this time, you can only explore this course in a self-paced fashion. Certain features of this course may not be active, but many people enjoy watching the videos and working with the materials. Make sure to check for reruns of this course. Quantum computation is a remarkable subject building on the great computational discovery that computers based on quantum mechanics are exponentially powerful. This course aims to make this cutting-edge material broadly accessible to undergraduate students, including computer science majors who do not have any prior exposure to quantum mechanics. The course starts with a simple introduction to the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics using the concepts of qubits (or quantum bits) and quantum gates. This treatment emphasizes the paradoxical nature of the subject, including entanglement, non-local correlations, the no-cloning theorem and quantum teleportation. The course covers the fundamentals of quantum algorithms, including the quantum fourier transform, period finding, Shor's quantum algorithm for factoring integers, as well as the prospects for quantum algorithms for NP-complete problems. It also discusses the basic ideas behind the experimental realization of quantum computers, including the prospects for adiabatic quantum optimization and the D-Wave controversy. Before your course starts, try the new edX Demo where you can explore the fun, interactive learning environment and virtual labs. Learn more.
Anytime
UC BerkeleyX  ●  Online
EE40LX teaches the fundamentals for engineering electronic interfaces between the physical world and digital devices. Students can expect to cover the material of a traditional first circuits course with a project-based approach. We start with essential theory and develop an understanding of the building blocks of electronics as we analyze, design, and build different parts of a robot from scratch around the Texas Instruments MSP430 microcontroller. Useful mathematics will be discussed where appropriate, but only a working knowledge of high school algebra is required to follow along. More experienced students will be able to dig deeper into optional modules that cover advanced concepts in analog circuit design. Some of these have been developed by practicing engineers in industry who know the tricks of the trade and have decided to share some of their insights to enhance the course. The philosophy of the course is to learn by doing, so every lecture features a substantial lab component. Students are invited to work together in small groups to build their own robots along with the instructors. There will also be individual circuit analysis and design exercises to reinforce the theories presented in the course. Those who successfully complete each theory assignment and earn a passing grade will get an honor code certificate from BerkeleyX. Additionally, a kit of electronic components costing under is available from Newark element14. Ordering pages are now available for North America, Europe, and Asia regions. The kit is not necessary to obtain a certificate for this run of the course, but it will greatly enhance your learning experience. Additionally, some mechanical components are required to complete the robot as presented in the course. Also, the lab experience will be most effective if you have access to a digital multimeter and an oscilloscope. The NI MyDAQ with myProtoBoard has been made available for students who would like to use this measurement equipment to follow along with the course. Creativity is encouraged! Students that are willing to work outside the bounds of the class to develop their own inventions will get the most out of this guided learning experience.
Anytime
UC BerkeleyX  ●  Online
This is a past/archived course. At this time, you can only explore this course in a self-paced fashion. Certain features of this course may not be active, but many people enjoy watching the videos and working with the materials. Make sure to check for reruns of this course. CS184.1x teaches the Foundations of Computer Graphics. Students will make images of 3D scenes in real-time, and with offline raytracing. This course runs for 6 weeks and consists of four segments. Each segment includes an individual programming assignment: Overview and Basic Math (Homework 0: 10% of grade) Transformations (Homework 1: 20% of grade) OpenGL and Lighting (Homework 2: 35% of grade) Raytracing (Homework 3: 35% of grade) This term, students who earn a total score of 50% or greater will have passed the course and may obtain a free honor code certificate from UC BerkeleyX. Before your course starts, try the new edX Demo where you can explore the fun, interactive learning environment and virtual labs.
Anytime

Why Use Allclasses?

Allclasses helps you find the best Fairfield, CT class listings. Find classes in Fairfield, CT zip codes starting in the next month, including classes on subjects like Science & Technology, Humanities & Social Sciences, Design, and Arts. We make it easy to find the classes you need by filtering start date, price level, instruction medium, and category. Filtering with keyword search is also possible, like "Mathematics", online only "Mathematics" classes, or classes in Fairfield, CT.

We make every attempt to get accurate prices, however, prices are not guaranteed.